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Burying Grounds, Cemeteries, Gravestones & History of Haverhill, Massachusetts

Cemeteries & History of Haverhill, Massachusetts

Haverhill, MA was established in 1641. Pronounced "HAY-vruhl," this area was originally called Pentucket which means "land of the winding river," by the local Pentucket Indian tribe.

It was first settled by Europeans in 1640 and purchased from the tribe in 1641 when the town was incorporated as "Haverhill," after Haverhill, England. It was attacked by Indians on March 15, 1697, when about 39 people were either killed or captured, and about 6 houses were burned. Some of these victims are buried in Pentucket Cemetery and their names are listed below.

Although it began as a farming community, it would evolve into an important industrial center, beginning with sawmills and gristmills run by water power . In the 18th century, Haverhill developed tanneries, shipping and shipbuilding. The mill town was for 180 years home to a large shoe-making industry, which faded with the Great Depression of the 1930s . It also once manufactured hats. Incorporated as a city in 1870, Haverhill would annex part of Bradford in 1897.

Haverhill was the site of the original Macy's store, established to sell dry goods in 1851 by Rowland H. Macy. It was also where Hollywood mogul Louis B. Mayer got his start in show business by operating a chain of theatres . The city has much fine old architecture , particularly in the Victorian style , built during the flush mill era. (Wikipedia)

Cemetery Contact Information:
4 Summer St., Haverhill, MA 01830
978-374-2312

Hillside Cemetery

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Pentucket Cemetery
The Pentucket Cemetery is located on Water Street in Haverhill and was established in 1668. It's located adjoining the Linwood Cemetery. This is a very early burying ground with several interesting early carvings. A few stones here date to the 1600's. See it's location and get directions at Yahoo Maps.

Pentucket Cemetery Status: Very Poor. Grounds are not kept and there are many broken stones. Currently listing 169 individuals. This project is about 80% complete.

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Sarah ??? d. 17?4
Lucia Appleton d. 1738
Mary Appleton d. 1737
Abigail Ayer d. 1726
Ebenezer Ayer d. 1695
Timothy Ayer d. 1745
Hannah Ayers d. 1729
Hannah Badger d. 1735
Mary Badger d. 1730
Mary Badger d. 1733
Mehetabel Badger d. 1738
Nathaniel Badger d. 1733
Nathaniel Badger d. 1764
Peaslee Badger d. 1733
William Badger d. 1763
Anna Bartlet d. 17??
Bailey Bartlett, jr. d. 1794, died in Lawrence, son of the Hon. Bailey Bartlett, sr., who was a member of the Massachusetts State Legistlature, US Representative from Massachusetts and a friend to John Adams and Samuel Adams.
Catherine Bartlett d. 1782
Enoch Bartlet d. 1763
Enoch Bartlet, Esq. d. 1789
Harriet Bartlet d. 1820
Katherine Bartlet d. 1761
Parnel Bartlett d. 1796
Elisabeth Bayley d. 1736, Victim of the Throat Distemper epidemic.
Elizabeth Bayley d. 1773
Colonel Joshua Bayley d. 1752
Mary Bayley d. 1736, Victim of the Throat Distemper epidemic.
Sarah Bracy d. 1821
Mary Bradbury d. 1835
Meariel Bradley d. 1746
Samuel Bradley d. 18??, "faithful servant" of James Duncan, Esq.
George Browne d. 1699
Martha Brown d. 1736, Victim of the Throat Distemper epidemic.
Nathaniel Brown d. 1736, Victim of the Throat Distemper epidemic.
Ebenezer Buck d. 1736, Victim of the Throat Distemper epidemic.
Lydia Buck d. 1736, Victim of the Throat Distemper epidemic.
Lydia Burrill d. 1789
Louisa Amelia Bartlett Carlton d. 1840, daughter of Hon. Bailey Bartlett, who was a member of the Massachusetts Legislature and a US Representative.
Elizabeth Chamberlain d. 1821
Wilson Chamberlain d. 1818
Abigail Soley Codman d. 1775, was "drove from Charlestown in April 1775 by ye Cruel hand of Oppression", better known as the British. Her husband, Capt. John Codman, in 1774, helped torch British tea in Charlestown's public market. In response the British burned down his home along with the rest of Charlestown.
Abigail Cogswell d. 1759
Thomas Cogwell d. 1761
Martha Currier d. 1848
Samuel Currier d. 1713
Elizabeth Duncan d. 1779
Elizabeth Duncan d. 1785
George Duncan d. 1766
Hannah Duncan d. 1813
James Duncan d. 1817
James Duncan Esq. d. 1822
Mary Duncan d. 1777
Rebekah White Duncan d. 1838
Samuel W. Duncan Esq. d. 1824
Anna Eaton d. 1766
John Eaton d. 1736
Mary Eaton d. 1728/29
Abigail Ela d. 1778
Israel Ela d. 1700
Lydia Ela d. 1738
Catherine B. Felt d. 1872
Joseph Flent/Flint d. 1735
Lydia White Peaslee Flint d. 1741
Alice Gage d. 1777
Ebenezer Gage d. 1811
Ebenezer Gage Esq. d. 1821
Enoch Gage d. 1778
Priscilla Gage d. 1819
Priscilla Jaques Gage d. 1816
Sarah Gage d. 1816
Rev. Joshua Gardner d. 1715/16, "Here lyes buried in ye land of forgiveness what was mortal of Rev. Mr. Joshua Gardner. A man good betimes & full of ye Holy Ghost."
Benjamin Green d. 1726, he died 18 days after his brother Nathaniel.
Nathaniel Green d. 1726
Lydia Haddock d. 1788
Susanna Haddock d. 1781
Mary Hazen d. 1730
Lieut. Richard Hazen d. 1733
Richard Hazzen d. 1753
Abigail Holgate d. 1737, Victim of the Throat Distemper epidemic. 1 of 5 children lost to James and Jemima Holgate in 25 days.
Deborah Holgate d. 1737, Victim of the Throat Distemper epidemic. 1 of 5 children lost to James and Jemima Holgate in 25 days.
James Holgate d. 1737, Victim of the Throat Distemper epidemic. 1 of 5 children lost to James and Jemima Holgate in 25 days.
Judith Holgate d. 1737, Victim of the Throat Distemper epidemic. 1 of 5 children lost to James and Jemima Holgate in 25 days.
Caleb Hopkinson d. 1741
Joanna Hyter d. 1846
Mary Pepperell Jarvis d. 1811
Ruth Johnson, photo 2 d. 1708
Sergeant John Keyzar d. 1696/97, killed during the same Indian raiding party that captured Hannah Dustin. After her newborn daughter was brutally murdered while they were taking the prisoners to back to the Indian camp, she and 2 others obtained hatchets and killed their captors. Hannah herself killed 9 out of the 10.
Abby Bartlett Kimball d. 1894
Caroline West Kimball d. 1851
Rev. Moses Kimball d. 1868
Samuel Kingsbery d. 1698
Enoch Marsh d. 1801
Hannah Marsh d. 1843
Harriett Marsh d. 1832
James Marsh d. 1792
Deacon John Marsh d. 1732, "A man of honest report and wisdom."
Moses Marsh Jr. d. 1815
Rebekah Marsh d. 1837
Christopher Martin d. 1719
Elisabeth McHard d. 1736, Victim of the Throat Distemper epidemic. 1 of 4 children lost to James and Margaret McHard in 19 days.
James McHard d. 1736, Victim of the Throat Distemper epidemic. 1 of 4 children lost to James and Margaret McHard in 19 days.
John McHard d. 1736, Victim of the Throat Distemper epidemic. 1 of 4 children lost to James and Margaret McHard in 19 days.
Whitely McHard d. 1736, Victim of the Throat Distemper epidemic. 1 of 4 children lost to James and Margaret McHard in 19 days.
Abigail Mitchel d. 1714
Sarah Mitchel d. 1736
Abigail Mooers d. 1778
John Parker Noyes d. 1756
Cornelius Page, second stone d. 1697
John Page jr. d. 1718
Eliphalet Patee d. 1741
Hannah Pearson d. 1734
Capt. James Pearson d. 1744
Nathaniel Peaslee d. 1730
Ruth Peaslee d. 1723
Abigail Peasley d. 1729
Daniel Pecker, heelstone d. 1727, unusual gravestone made for twin boys.
Capt. John Pecker, photo 2 d. 1756
William Pecker, heelstone d. 1726
Benjamin Rideout d. 1737, Victim of the Throat Distemper epidemic.
Rev. Benjamin Rolfe, second stone d. 1708, he along with his wife and two children were "barbarously murdered by enemies", meaning Indians. He is also great grandfather to Samuel Adams.
Mehitable Rolfe Sr., second stone d. 1708, murdered by Indians. She is also great grandmother to Samuel Adams.
Mehitable Rolfe Jr., second stone d. 1708, murdered by Indians.
Anna White Saltonstall d. 1841
Elizabeth Ward Saltonstall d. 1711
Mary Cooke Saltonstall d. 1804
Hon. Nathaniel Saltonstall d. 1707. grandson of Sir Richard Saltonstall, one of the original Patentees of Massachusetts Bay Colony. He was also judge of the Court of Oyer and Terminer which was assembled to try the persons accused of practicing witchcraft in Salem. After he resigned from the court in June 1692, shortly after the trial of Bridget Bishop, and became a prominent critic of the Salem proceedings and was himself accused of witchcraft. He was replaced by Judge Corwin.
Dr. Nathaniel Saltonstall d. 1815
Richard Saltonstall Esq. d. 1714
Hon. Richard Saltonstall d. 1736, judge of the Superior Court.
Elisabeth Sanders d. 1730
John Sanders d. 1737
Mary Sanders d. 1747
Left. Nathaniel Sanders d. 1754
Nathaniel Sargeant d. 1731
Rhoda Peaslee Sargeant d. 1774
Hannah Jane Smith d. 1830
Rev. Hezekiah Smith, DD d. 1737, born at Long Island NY, ordained in Charleston SC, first pastor of the Baptist Church of Haverhill MA and is known as one of the Baptist "Fathers" of New England. He also served as a Chaplain in the Revolutionary War and had a close friendship with General George Washington.
Timothy Smith d. 1716
Jonathan Souther d. 1761
Nathaniel Souther d. 1766
Elizabeth Sparhawk d. 1782
Elizabeth Swan d. 1696
Robert Swan d. 1697,
John Thaxter Esq. d. 1791
John Adams Thaxter d. 1799
Mary Saltonstall Varnum d. 1813
Rev. John Ward d. 1693
Capt. Simon Wainwright d. 1708, "barberously slain by ye French & Indien enimie."
Abby D. Harris Walker d. 1843
Nathaniel Walker d. 1829
Lydia Walker d. 1755
Eldridge West d. 1845
Eliza West d. 1815
James West d. 1773
James West d. 1791
Mary West d. 1848
Richard West d. 1817
Thomas West d. 1782
Abigail Peaslee White d. 1730
John White, Esq. , second stone d. 1727
John White d. 1745
Lydia White d. 1736
Nathaniel White d. 1737, Victim of the Throat Distemper epidemic.
Samuel White d. 1736, Victim of the Throat Distemper epidemic.
William White d. 1737, Victim of the Throat Distemper epidemic.
Nathaniel Whittier d. 1740
Polly D. Winter d. 18??, "Faithful servant" of James Duncan, Esq.
Susannah Woodman

Whittier Family Cemetery at
John Greenleaf Whittier Birthplace

The Whittier Family Burial Ground is located at the John Greenleaf Whittier Birthplace on Whittier Road and was established in 1696. All of the people listed are ancestors of John Greenleaf Whittier. See it's location and get directions at Yahoo Maps.

 

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Abigail Hussey Whittier d. 1857
John Whittier d. 1830
Joseph Whittier d. 1739
Joseph Whittier d. 1796
Mary Peasley Whittier d. 1676
Ruth Green Whittier d. 1710
Sarah Greenleaf Whittier d. 1807
Thomas Whittier d. 1696

More History in Haverhill to Visit

Bradford Common Historic District
Also known as Bradford Common Area
S. Main St., Haverhill
Listed on National Register of Historic Places.

Ephraim Davis House
Merrimack Rd., N of jct. with Amesbury Line Rd.
Listed on National Register of Historic Places.

Emerson House
5--9 Pentucket St.
Private residence. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Hannah Duston Garrison House
665 Hilldale Avenue
Hannah Duston was a colonial England woman who, having been captured during an Indian raid, escaped from her captors by killing them in the night and fleeing in their canoe . She is believed to be the first woman honored in the United States with a statue. Hannah, her husband Thomas, and her nine children were living in Haverhill, Massachusetts when in 1697 the town was attacked by Abenaki Indians. Hannah, her baby Martha, who was only days old, and her nurse Mary Neff were captured and forced to march into the wilderness. The Indians took the baby from Hannah and killed her by smashing her against a tree. Hannah and Mary were taken 150 miles to an island in the Merrimack River near what is now Concord, N.H. , where the party stayed some days. Hannah there led Mary and a 14-year-old captive boy in a revolt after all were asleep, using the Indians' tomahawks to kill 10 of the 12 Indians. They escaped in a canoe, taking with them scalps as proof of the incident. They travelled down the river only during the night, and after several days arrived back in Haverhill. The Massachusetts General Assembly later awarded them a reward for killing the raiders (various accounts say 50 or 25 pounds, and some accounts allege that only Duston received the award). The event became well known, due in part to the account of Cotton Mather in his Magnalia Christi Americana . She became more famous in the nineteenth century as her story was retold by Henry David Thoreau. *Src: Wikipedia

Hannah Duston Landing
near Bradley's Brook
After their escape from the Indian tribe that kidnapped them, they traveled down the Merrimack River by canoe and landed at this spot. The place is marked by a large millstone set into a memorial.

Hannah Duston Memorial
99 Main Street

Hastings--Morse House
595 E. Broadway
Private residence. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Haverhill Historical Society & Buttonwoods Museum
240 Water St.
Phone: (978) 374-4626
From Native American settlement to the present, the Buttonwoods Museum tells the story of life in the Merrimack Valley. Visit the John Ward House, the Duncan House and the Daniel Hunkins Shoe Shop. Experience our hands-on education and outreach programs that make this unique history come alive for people of all ages.
The Historical Society offers a variety of education programs, workshops, lectures, and fundraising events. Check out their online calendar for dates and activities. Closed for tours November 1 - March 15 Open for programs and research Tues.-Sat. 10:00 am - 5:00 pm and also by appointment.

Hazen--Spiller House
8 Groveland St.
Private residence. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

John Greenleaf Whittier Homestead
305 Whittier Road
In 1688, in a small pleasant valley under the shoulder of Job's Hill, Thomas Whittier, the pioneer, built the house which was to be the Whittier family homestead. The family lived there for five generations and it was the Birthplace of the Quaker Poet and Abolitionist John Greenleaf Whittier on December 17, 1807. The Whittier Homestead is an outstanding example of the old New England farm, located on its original site, is substantially the same as when the Poet lived there in 1807 until 1836. The homestead is the setting of his most famous and beloved poem Snow-Bound. Many settings from his poems are recognizable to those who have read them.
Open May 1 October 31 Wednesday, Friday, Saturday: 10:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Thursday: 10:00 - 11:45 a.m. & 1:45 - 5:00 p.m. Sunday: 1:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m. Closed July 4. November 1 April 30
Wednesday, Friday & Sunday: 1:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m. Thursday: 1:45 - 5:00 p.m.
Saturday: 10:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Or by prior arrangements

Main Street Historic District
Main, Summer Sts.
Listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Peabody School
170 Salem St.
Listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Peaslee Garrison House
790 East Broadway
Built before 1675, the house was used as an armory at one time and was constructed with bricks imported from England. During King Philip's War the home was used as a garrison house where soldiers were stationed and people could run for protection.

Primrose Street Schoolhouse
71 Primrose St.
Listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Rocks Village Historic District
East Main Street and River Road
Rocks Village, in Haverhill's East Parish, was settled circa 1643. A ferry was established soon after. East Broadway, one of the oldest roads in Haverhill, leads into Rocks village which then follows along the Merrimack River into Merrimacport. In the 18th century, Rocks Village evolved into a maritime site. Several of Haverhill's shipyards were located here. It was also a center for trade of both imported and exported goods. Comb manufacturing was also carried on here. Haverhill's industrial growth in the 19th century bypassed the East Parish, preserving much of the rural Georgian architecture. Among structures of interest are the hand-cranked drawbridge and the firehouse. Rocks Village is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

School Street School
40 School St.
Listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Sights in and around Haverhill

Washington Street Shoe Distric
Washington, Wingate, Emerson Sts. Railroad and Washington Sqs.
Italianate, Queen Anne, Romanesque buildings. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Winnekenni Castle
347 Kenoza Ave.
Dr. James R. Nichols, a local physician and inventor, built the Castle in 1873-1875 as a summer home at this farm which he named Winnekenni. The idea for the original castle came from England. The Castle was sold to the city in 1895. In 1967, after a devastating fire destroyed the aging building, a group of citizens formed the Winnekenni Foundation, which is still in existence today. Its goal was to completely refurbish the interior of the building, and make it and its surrounding grounds available to the public for cultural and educational events. Call the Winnekenni Foundation at 978-521-1686 for castle rental charges and policies.

Find more museums in Massachusetts

 

If you know of an historic place to visit in Haverhill, please submit it to jenn@gravematter.com

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